Friday, July 14, 2006

A Beautiful Post on the Beautiful Game

This should serve as a helpful primer for those of you more enraptured with the sport called "football" in the USA. You know, the game in which the only players who actually use their feet are scorned as "non-athletes" by the 350 pound lumps who push people. Great thoughts on the social/cultural implications too.

5 comments:

Coach C said...

This was a great post by Bixby. (I really have nothing to say, I just have to keep up my commitment to commenting everytime you have a post about soccer.) We haven't heard from Paul or T and J on the topic of the World Cup - I am interested in their reaction to the head-butt.

Irenaeus II said...

Note: Truth and Justice has been renamed to Irenaeus II for blog reasons.

Again Ben, we must wonder about the biased manner in which you cover thoccer. I will simply say that ALL football players use their feet. Even the big, lumpy guys have to move quickly. The ones who exclusively move their feet that constantly cost teams a win are the ones ridiculed.

The only act of bravery, ever, in thoccer was the head butt by a frenchie of all people. Did he get a medal of honor for his bravery? Nope, he got ejected. If you read the lips of the ref, you can see that he said, "We will have no bravery in this sport, especially when the whole world is watching."

Paul said...

I have absolutley no idea about whatever this head butt is or was. Though it sounds more exciting than the dramatic leg tangle, the result was probably the same--some dude getting carried off on a stretcher.

Thankfully it will be another 4 yrs. before I am confronted with soccer in a semi-unavoidable way. I really tried this year--honestly. It was brutal.

Bring on the friday night lights of crisp fall evenings and the riveting battles on college gridirons all over the country!

NeoFundy said...

This link is for you, Ben...
http://widelec.org/zidane.html

Ben said...

Ha! That's great.

Took me a while to figure out I was supposed to do something though. I guess I've drunken deeply of the spectator culture.